Resources

Access Counseling/Advocacy Services:

Student Health and Counseling (SHAC)
505.277.3136 (24-hr number)
Counseling, crisis intervention and medical services for eligible students.

Counseling and Referral Services (CARS)
505.272.6868
Free counseling services for eligible staff, faculty, and their spouses/partners and retirees

LGBTQ Resource Center
505.277.5428
Victim Advocates

Agora Crisis Center
505.277.3013
Agora's services include online emotional support (chat), information and referrals, volunteer opportunities and community education and training.


Health Sciences Center Resources

https://hsc.unm.edu/school-of-medicine/education/assets/doc/wellness/psychotherapy-guide.pdf

 

24 Hour Resources:

UNM Police Department

For Emergencies: 911

On Campus Escorts: (505) 277-2241
UNM Security: (505) 277-6059
UNM Hospital Security (North Campus): (505) 272-2160

LoboRESPECT Advocacy Center Hotline (505) 277-2911

Rape Crisis Center of Central New Mexico (community resource for issues of sexual violence) 505) 266-7711
Agora Crisis Center (volunteer based crisis hotline)
(505) 277-3013
Student Health and Counseling (SHAC) - After Hours Crisis Counselor
(505) 277-3136 and select Option 3

Sexual Misconduct and Assault Response Team (SMART)

UNM and community partners have developed a victim centered and victim controlled process to help you. You can choose which services you want to use. Please click the link above for information and resources for individuals affected by sexual misconduct.

Call 911 if You Are in Immediate Danger!

First Steps to Consider:

  • Get to a safe place
  • Preserve all physical evidence of the assault, even if you are unsure whether you want to report the crime.
    • Don't shower or wash clothing
    • Save all text messages, emails, social media postings (taking screenshots can be helpful) or anything else that might relate to the assault, or that might be helpful later in reconstructing a timeline of events.
    • Write down the names of people who might have seen you immediately before or after, as it's easy to forget names or locations.
    • Even if you do not want to participate in the investigative process now, you might later change your mind, so it's helpful to preserve as much information as possib
  • Obtain a forensic exam

    • UNMPD can provide transportation-even if you do not want to file a police report!
  • Go to a nearby hospital or medical center for medical attention
  • Call a trusted friend, family member or someone else who can provide emotional support.
  • Contact a resource center to help you navigate your options
  • Contact a University Survivor Advocate

For help 24 hours a day, contact the LoboRESPECT Advocacy Center | (505) 277-2911

Getting Medical Attention:

  • Albuquerque Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE)
    • Off Campus. Located at 625 Silver Ave SW
    • 505.884.SANE (7263) (24-hr dispatch)
    • 24-hour free medical and forensic exams by trained nurses; emergency contraception; treatment for sexually transmitted infection; evidence collection; forensic photography; follow-up services. UNMPD can provide transportation-even if you do not want to file a police report! SANE may be able to collect evidence within 5 days of an assault.

Access Counseling/Advocacy Services:

  • Student Health and Counseling (SHAC)
    • 505.277.3136 (24-hr number)
    • Counseling, crisis intervention and medical services for eligible students. Can help expedite referrals to SANE.
  • Rape Crisis Center of Central New Mexico
    • Off Campus. Located at 9741 Candelaria NE
    • 505.266.7711 (24-hr hotline)
    • 505.266.7712 (Counseling)
    • Provide Victim Advocates, free counseling, and a 24 hour hotline. An advocate can meet you for a SANE exam and attend meetings or hearings with you.
  • Counseling and Referral Services (CARS)
    • 505.272.6868
    • Free counseling services for eligible staff, faculty, and their spouses/partners and retirees
  • Women's Resource Center
    • o 505.277.3716
    • o Free counseling and advocacy
  • LGBTQ Resource Center
    • o 505.277.5428
    • o Free counseling and advocacy
  • LoboRESPECT Advocacy Center
    • o 505.277.3716
    • o Advocacy & multiple resources

Campus Law Enforcement:

  • UNMPD (University of New Mexico Police Department)
    • o 505.277.2241 (24-hr number)
    • o Specially trained SMART officers will respond to and investigate sex crimes cases on campus and will forward cases to the District Attorney’s Office as appropriate.

Hate/Bias

The University of New Mexico is committed to creating and maintaining a community in which students and employees can learn and work together in an atmosphere that enhances productivity and draws on the diversity of its members, and is free from all forms of disrespectful conduct, intimidation, exploitation, and harassment.

Report an Incident

Call 911 if You Are in Immediate Danger!

First Steps to Consider:

  • Get to a safe place
  • Preserve all evidence.
  • Save all text messages, emails, social media postings (taking screenshots can be helpful) or anything else that might relate to the incident.
  • Go to a nearby hospital or medical center for medical attention, if needed
  • Call a trusted friend, family member or someone else who can provide emotional support.
  • Contact a resource center to help you navigate your options

 

Campus Law Enforcement:

UNMPD (University of New Mexico Police Department)
505.277.2241 (24-hr number)

Bullying

Bullying comes in all forms but is usually thought of as a K-12 issue that ceases to exist once students head off to college. This is not the case. In a 2012 study, 15% of college students admitted being bullied, and 22% reported being cyberbullied, through texts, emails, and social media.
Often times, bullying is not reported in colleges and universities because students do not feel that is a "serious" enough issue to report. Bullying prevention is important because it is often times a precursor to more serious issues, including but not limited to: hazing, hate/bias incidents, and sexual misconduct. Stopping bullying when it starts is key.

First Steps to Consider in a Crisis Situation

  • Get to a safe place
  • Preserve all evidence.
  • Save all text messages, emails, social media postings (taking screenshots can be helpful) or anything else that might relate to the incident.
  • Go to a nearby hospital or medical center for medical attention, if needed
  • Call a trusted friend, family member or someone else who can provide emotional support.
  • Contact a resource center to help you navigate your options

 

Campus Law Enforcement:

UNMPD (University of New Mexico Police Department)

505.277.2241 (24-hr number)

Hazing

The University of New Mexico prohibits hazing activities as requirements for acceptance, advancement, membership or continued measure of good standing in formal/informal student groups, clubs or athletic teams.

Call 911 if You Are in Immediate Danger!

First Steps to Consider:

  • Get to a safe place
  • Preserve all evidence.
  • Save all text messages, emails, social media postings (taking screenshots can be helpful) or anything else that might relate to the incident.
  • Go to a nearby hospital or medical center for medical attention, if needed
  • Call a trusted friend, family member or someone else who can provide emotional support.
  • Contact a resource center to help you navigate your options

If you have been hazed...

Reactions to being hazed vary. Two people who go through the same experience might feel quite differently. Some people feel relatively positive about going through hazing (seeing it as an achievement), some feel mildly annoyed, and others have strong negative reactions. Reactions depend on the extent of the hazing, individual characteristics, and past experiences. For people who have been abused in the past, hazing can be re-traumatizing.

  • Anger, confusion, betrayal, fear, resentment, embarrassment, humiliation, hopelessness, helplessness, anxiety and depression are all normal reactions to being hazed.
  • Physical consequences can include exhaustion, headaches, hangovers, illnesses, injuries, and scars.
  • It's common to believe that things won't get worse, though they often do.
  • You may want the hazing to stop, but don't want to get the group in trouble.
  • You may want to leave, but fear the consequences or feel like you've invested too much already to walk away.
  • Self-blame can occur and is fueled by hazers who tell new members that they will let others down if they leave or tell anyone what is going on.
Please seek out help and report the incident. For more information about what an individual can do, please see the resources put together by Duke University.

Access Medical/Counseling Services:

Student Health and Counseling (SHAC)

505.277.3136 (24-hr number)
Counseling, crisis intervention and medical services for eligible students.

Campus Law Enforcement:

UNMPD (University of New Mexico Police Department) 505.277.2241 (24-hr number)